Kaya “Kok” (Puff)@Aulong, Taiping

Demona: Kaya Kok! Ohhhh.. Kaya Kok! A small, single storey house, located in one of the little roads of Aulong was converted into a mini bakery, producing only kaya puffs. Due to the coming festive Chinese New Year, the owner also made some cookies for sale as well.

The kaya puffs made here are the greatest! I have tried the kaya puffs from various places but they could never match up to the ones made here! There was a giant tub of bubbly steaming hot, freshly made kaya near the oven. The kaya looked *drooling* yummy!

Demona: The size of the kaya puff was fairly big. The pastry was quite thick, yet flaky. The texture made each bite… HEAVENLY!

Demona: Having delicious pastry skin will not make this kaya puff such a major blast without the STAR ingredient… the kaya filling! The light brown coloured kaya tasted sweet, egg-like, with a mixture of caramel and crumbly texture. It is very hard to find a decent kaya puff because most of them never aced in both key points, the filling and the pastry skin.

Verdict: It comes in a pack of 5 puffs. Due to the recent increase in flour and sugar, the baker has also raised the praise of a pack, from the usual RM 3.50 to RM 4.00. Nevertheless, each piece still cost RM 0.80, which is cheaper than the average one that you can get here (usually around RM 1.00-RM 1.20, sometimes, even more).

Kaya Kok. You shall always be near in my heart. SLURPS!

Chiku Chips@Home

Demona: DARN! I forgotten to take the picture of the small onion, chestnut like thing which mom bought to thinly slice and fry into chips. She only knows it as “CHIKU”, unsure of what the English term is for it. I googled on it as well and failed to find out its name. Does anyone know? Do drop me a message! PLEASE!

Demona: The “chiku” is small in size, thus yield of one, being thinly sliced is low. From what I observed, frying these chips required a lot of effort. Even mom said that frying this involved a lot of work.

Demona: The chips were really yummy! They tasted sweet and salty, and the texture was crunchy. Somehow or rather, the oil did not over adsorb itself into the chip which you normally get in many types (eg: tapioca, potato) causing them to release a pungent oily odour.

Verdict: After making a full small tin, mom decided that these chips will only be made for our own family consumption and not to be given out as the workload was too much for her. It is no wonder that the chiku chips are sold with a golden price tag in the market!