Tuna sashimi overload@”It’s Good Taste of Blue Fin Tuna Since 2011″ restaurant, D’cube City, Seoul

image

As there was no English translated name for the tuna specialty sashimi restaurant, the only English words available at this place were printed on their serviettes which stated “It’s Good Taste of Blue Fin Tuna Since 2011”. Nonetheless, if you do visit D’Cube City, it will be a breeze finding this place as there is only 1 restaurant which served these, up on the 5th or 6th floor, near TGI’Fridays. I took a photo of the outside area for easy viewing.

image

We sat by the “bar” for lunch. Instead of watching the bartender does his magic mixing alcoholic potions, we watched the skillful sashimi chef slicing away rows and rows of tuna meat from various parts of the fish. It was quite awesome knowing he could converse perfect Mandarin, and was extremely courteous in teaching us how best enjoy eating tuna sashimi like local Koreans do.

image

These sushis came as part of the sashimi set taken too.

 

imageThe star dish arrived soon after. It only took the chef several minutes to slice these deliciousness up and salivating juices were piling up in my mouth already. Ngarm ngarm ngarm ngarm!

image

Essentials for a proper Korean-style sashimi eating.

imageThe chef gave me a Korean-tuna-sashimi-eating 101 study guide after observing me mix and matching my way through eating the sashimis, which were all totally wrong. He packed up this combi in the photo and then told me to wrap them up and stuff the entire “popiah” in my mouth.

He was absolutely spot on, right! The coldness of the tuna, with a fresh rawness taste to it, was mixed with some sourish pickles, spiced up with a dash of wasabi and the vegs added a slight hint of bitterness to it, and finally all these were wrapped up by a savoury slice of baked and dried seaweed.

Honestly speaking, eating sashimis like Koreans is like a 360 degree turn from eating sashimis like Japs.

imageAnother obvious difference was that side dishes were served to you, regardless of the dish you ordered. You would not get this much of sides for sure in other meals, the Koreans really love feeding their customers and ensuring that their meals and experiences after finishing their meal were positive.

imageThis additional tonkatsu dish (About 8000 won, or about RM 25 – 30) was quite a let down. It did not taste really fiery hot, like ones freshly fried from the deep fryer, and I strongly believed that the chicken meat was fried and kept aside for some time and re-fried / re-heated upon receiving an order.

The tonkatsu set cost about 8000 korean won/ RM 25 – 30. Not worth it at all, best that you reserve the additional 8000 korean won and purchase some other more yummylicious relevant apps and foodies.

imageI tried to take a photograph of every food served, but there were just too much food served that I could not even take all the food, within the frame of the mobile phone. Thankfully, they were mainly vegs and psychologically, the meal did still feel rather healthy to me. *BURPS*

 

imageThe chef seemed rather amused watching me snapping those photos away and he just whipped up a california roll without reason. Within one glance, you could tell that the california roll looked vastly different from the average rolls you get in a Jap restaurant. The roes were pale yellow, rather than bright orange and the sticky rice and bitter note vegs were wrapped with taosted salted seaweed slices. It was quite tasty, and I had to pull my brakes to cut off the carb intake, otherwise, my zipper had got to go to give my tummy breathing space.

Each sashimi set meal cost 23,000 won/ RM 70 – 80.

For that kinda’ price and to be served with such a great variety of food appetizers, we can never find such a meal at such a price anymore in the Klang Valley.

I WILL BE BACK.. FOR MORE!

Website: http://www.dcubecity.com

 

 

 

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *